Archives

31

Jan

2014

Cedar Key Sampler

IN: Blog, classes, The Ball Of Yarn, yarn

TBY calendarBe sure to check our calendar of classes at The Ball of Yarn in Ormond Beach. Next month we will be making a Cedar Key sampler scarf. Grab some yarn and come join us.

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29

Jan

2014

Book Signing Tomorrow!

IN: Blog, Crochet, Knitting, The Ball Of Yarn, yarn

1-26  Terry Du Long book closeupThe day is finally here and we are so excited to be having Terri DuLong at our own yarn store in Ormond Beach! She will be here tomorrow, Thursday, January 30, from 1-3 pm to sign copies of her latest book, Secrets on Cedar Key. Bring your book and your yarn and come say hello.

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27

Jan

2014

February’s Newsletter

IN: Crochet, Knitting, The Ball Of Yarn

terri dulongDid you see our February newsletter from Ormond Beach? It includes an interesting history of crochet and a bio of our favorite knitting writer, Terri DuLong.

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24

Jan

2014

Terri DuLong Book Signing

IN: Blog, Knitting, The Ball Of Yarn

TBY Terri DuLongIf you are a fan of Terri DuLong’s Cedar Key books, you don’t want to miss her book signing of her newest book, Secrets on Cedar Key. The signing will take place at The Ball of Yarn on Thursday January 30, from 1 – 3 pm. Books are available here for $15. Be sure to mark your calendar.

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22

Jan

2014

Looking for a New Project?

IN: Blog, Crochet, Knitting, The Ball Of Yarn

knitting booksIf you are looking for a new project, come on in to The Ball of Yarn and browse our free patterns for knitting and crochet.

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20

Jan

2014

Class for Beginners

IN: Blog, Crochet, Knitting, The Ball Of Yarn

yarnJoin us tomorrow, Tuesday, at The Ball of Yarn for beginning knitting and crochet class. You don’t have to be a newbie, come in and just join in the fun.

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17

Jan

2014

Cedar Key Book Signing

IN: Crochet, Knitting, The Ball Of Yarn

TBY Terri DuLongOur humble yarn shop, The Ball of Yarn will be hosting Terri DuLong for a signing of her newest book, Secrets on Cedar Key. The signing will be on Thursday January 30, from 1 – 3 pm. Get your book here for $15 and mark your calendar.

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16

Jan

2014

A History of Crochet

IN: Crochet, The Ball Of Yarn, yarn

yellow flower crochetIn the history of crochet, there is no definitive beginning. There are no records of the “Eureka” moment when someone figured out how to make a bunch of knots into something useful. The word ‘crochet’ is a derivative of the French word ‘croche,’ which means hook.

Knitting and crochet are similar in that they both involve pulling loops of yarn through other loops of yarn. Crochet is different from knitting in that only one stitch is active at any one time (with a few exceptions) and the stitches are generally taller than knitted stitches. In addition, the tool used is a crochet hook, rather than two knitting needles.

Most Likely Start

Research indicates that crochet most likely came from an ancient form of Chinese embroidery that was known throughout North Africa, Turkey, India and Persia, and the technique reached Europe in the 1700s. The technique, was called “tambouring,” from the French word for drum, “tambour.” This involved stretching a piece of fabric onto a frame and then using a needle with a hook, a loop of the working thread was drawn up through the fabric and then brought down again a bit beyond and another loop from the working thread brought up through the preceding loop – creating a chain stitch. Toward the end of the 18th century, the fabric of tambour was dispensed with and the stitch was worked alone, creating what the French referred to as “crochet in the air.”

This craft began appearing in Europe in early 1800. In the 1840s Mlle. Riego de la crochet matBranchardiere gave it a marvelous lift. She was well known for her talent for taking old bobbin and needle lace designs and turning them into patterns for crochet that could be duplicated easily, unlike knitting patterns that were more widely available. She claimed to have invented the lace-like crochet that we call Irish crochet today. Mlle. Riego published numerous pattern books, allowing millions to copy her designs.

Crochet and the Irish Famine

Irish crochet helped many Irish survive the Irish potato famine that occurred between 1845 and 1850, when over one million people died. Crocheting became one of the only ways they could make money to keep from starving. Men, women and children organized crochet cooperatives and schools were created and teachers were sent all over Ireland to teach the craft of crochet.

Most were living in primitive conditions and keeping the crocheted items was something of a problem. However, it was found that the pieces could be washed and returned to their original state. Buyers of the ‘lace’ were unaware that their frills – delicate collars and cuffs – were the lifeblood of those who created the crocheted pieces. lace collar

Between the years 1845 and 1859, two million Irish had immigrated to America. They brought the skill of crochet along with them and American women soon took up the new craft.

Tools of the Trade

Materials for making yarn have been many and varied. Grasses, hair, animal fur, sinew, flax, hemp, gold and silver and copper strands, wool from sheep, goats and rabbits, cotton, silk thread, linen and mixtures thereof have all been used to create crochet and knitting yarns.

With the modernization of creating thread and yarn, we now have a fabulous selection of yarns available to us at yarn shops and stores. Cotton, silk, wool such as mohair, angora, and alpaca, synthetic yarns, and mixtures of these to provide the desired result wanted for the project.

hooksCrochet tools have certainly become easier to come by and use. In earlier times, hooks were made using metal, fishbone, horn, brass, mother of pearl, ivory, copper, ebonite, agate and most anything else that could be shaped to serve the purpose. Research turned up crochet hooks from the potato famine period that were made with a needle or stiff wire stuck into a piece of wood or a cork. Today, of course, you can go into most any large store or yarn shop and find crochet hooks in several sizes, materials, and colors.

The craft of crochet seems to be ‘discovered’ by each new generation, but it maintains a steady stream of enthusiasts. You can find a free crochet and knitting pattern most anywhere you find yarn for sale.

Here at The Ball of Yarn, we love sharing our love of knitting and crochet and we treat all of our visitors like family. We have weekly classes where we learn and have a lot of fun at the same time. Come and visit us for fun, friends and fabulous yarn!

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15

Jan

2014

Spring Time

IN: Crochet, Knitting, The Ball Of Yarn

TBY bulbsAlthough it’s cold and wintery now, spring and Easter aren’t that far off. The Ball of Yarn has all the yarns, knitting patterns and accessories you need for getting ready for the winter thaw.

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14

Jan

2014

Terri DuLong and Cedar Key

IN: Blog, Crochet, Knitting, The Ball Of Yarn, yarn

TBY Terri DuLongTerri DuLong is a bestselling author listed in the New York Times and USA Today. She is also a featured writer on GoodReads.com. She is an avid reader, writer, pet lover and knitter. She is the writer of the popular Cedar Keys series of novels.

In the Beginning

Terri was born in the area around Boston, Massachusetts. She was an only child and sometimes created imaginary friends with which to keep company. The playmates and her love of books probably led to her love of writing.

She married young and had three children. After divorcing, Terri decided to take college courses to begin work as a legal secretary. After she met and then married her current husband, Terri began to pursue a career as a registered nurse (RN). Part of her training to become an RN included work in a psychiatric facility north of Boston, which led in 2002, to her very first published novel, Lost Souls of the Witches’ Castle and the prequel Daughters of the Mill.

After working many years as a critical care RN, Terri began to consider becoming a “serious” writer and she started by taking a creative writing class at college. With encouragement from her professor under her belt, Terri took the plunge again and began writing with the hope of being published by a large New York publisher. She began going to more and more writers’ conferences, reading and networking, learning about the world of publishing; all the while continuing to work on her writing.

Kismet

Terri and her husband, Ray, relocated to Cedar Key, Florida, from the Tampa area in February 2005 after Ray’s retirement. Terri started writing a blog (islandwriter.net) to help keep family and friends abreast of transitioning to life in a small town. She continued writing and submitting to publishers and receiving rejections. After a time, however, she began to notice that the rejections were no longer cold form letters, but they were starting to be correspondence that was nice and personal: so she kept on writing, knowing that there had to be a publisher, agent or editor who would love her work.

Cedar Key is a small island off the west coast of Florida and a small town where Terri and Ray had visited several times. They knew it was where they wanted to live after Ray’s retirement. It turned out to be just the thing to fuel Terri’s inner muse. This was a small town where everyone knew each other and there was no shortage of quirky characters. Terri was really in her element and the area touched her heart.

Success at Last

Terri had a finished novel for woman based in Cedar Key at the time she attended the conference 12-11 Terry Du Long bookof Romance Writers of America in the summer of 2007. After returning home, she took the required first three chapters and sent them off to Kensington Books and life continued on as normal. However, in December 2007, Terri got an email from an editor’s assistant at Kensington Books asking that Terri send the full manuscript. By February 2008, Terri had a two-book contract with Kensington. Her persistence had paid off.

In October 2009, Terri’s debut fiction novel for women, Spinning Forward, was released and the Cedar Key series was begun. The second book, Casting About, was published one year later in 2010. The third book, Sunrise on Cedar Key was published October 2011, followed by Postcards from Cedar Key in October 2012. The most recent installment in the Cedar Key series, book number 5, Secrets on Cedar Key, was published in November 2013. Book 6, Farewell to Cedar Key, will be released November 2014. You can also find her novella, A Cedar Key Christmas in the anthology, Holiday Magic, published by Kensington Books in 2010.

Terri’s first two books are available in eBook for Kindle and Nook. Kensington Publishing recently announced that all six of her books would be available as audiobooks this year also.

Terri’s novels center on the craft of knitting, community, friendship and family. She is relocating again to the lovely city of Ormond Beach, Florida, where she will be holding a book signing on Thursday, January 30, 2014 from 1:00 pm to 3:00 pm at The Ball of Yarn, located at 156-A W. Granada Blvd., Ormond Beach, 32174. The novel, Secrets on Cedar Key is available at the shop for $15.00.

 

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